Blindfold Solitaire

User Guide

Overview

Blindfold Solitaire is a fully accessible Solitaire game for both sighted and visually impaired people, designed for rapid audio play.

You control this game using iPhone gestures.
First, in the main menu, tap the button “NEW KLONDIKE – DEAL 3 CARDS” – to start playing Klondike Solitaire.
This is the typical game of Solitaire where you build all four suits up from ace to king in separate piles, and
28 cards are dealt into seven piles, in the following manner:
The first pile (left to right) includes one card, the second pile includes two cards, the third pile includes three cards, etc., so that the last pile has seven cards. Each time you draw from the deck, you get 3 cards.

Blindfold Solitaire includes many types of Solitaire such as Klondike, Free Cell, Spider and Addition Games.
Each of the games are described in the corresponding help.

There are three groups of cards: the waste pile, the foundation and the tab-low.

In Klondike-3, the waste pile contains cards that you have just drew from the deck. You can normally see the top 3 cards.
The foundation is where there are 4 piles of cards, built from ace to king, of the same suit.
The tab-low is where there are 7 piles of cards, where only the top card is showing.
There is a cursor – similar to a voice-over cursor – that determines which pile and card you are at within each group.

To go directly to the waste pile, tap at the top of the screen.
To go directly to a card in the foundation deck, tap in the upper half of the screen.
To go directly to a card in the tab-low, tap in the lower half of the screen.
To flip between the waste pile, foundation and tab-low, swipe left with 2 fingers.

To move within a pile, flick up or down. To move left or right between piles, flick left and right.
When you move right or left, the cursor is placed at the top card of the pile.
If you hear a double beep sound, it means you reached the top or bottom of a pile, you are at the leftmost or rightmost pile.
To find out where the cursor is, shake the phone.

To hear all of the cards in the pile where your cursor is, swipe down with 2 fingers.
To hear the top card in each of the piles in the group you are in, swipe up with 2 fingers.
Press for a second, and then slide your finger up and down to hear the cards in the current pile.
Sliding up reads from the current card to the bottom of the pile; sliding down reads from the current card to the top of the pile.
Press for a second, and then slide your finger left or right to hear the top cards in each pile.

To select one or more cards to move, tap twice. You will hear a kettle drum sound, and you’ll be told how many cards you are moving.
Then go to another pile in the tab-low or foundation, and tap twice. The cards are moved, and you’ll hear a chime.
If the move is not allowed, you will hear the error.
To cancel a move, shake the phone, or swipe down with 3 fingers.

To move the waste pile top card to where the cursor is, tap three times. The card is moved, and you’ll hear a chime.
If the move is not allowed, you will hear the error.
To hear the waste pile top card, the number of cards in the deck and the waste pile, tap once with 2 fingers.

If one of the cards on the waste pile or the tab-low can be moved to the foundation, you will hear a zip-pop-bop sound. You can turn that off in SETTINGS.
To automatically move one card to the foundation, tap twice, with 2 fingers.
To automatically move all possible cards to the foundation, press and hold 2 fingers for a few seconds.
You must turn on that feature in SETTINGS.

To draw more cards from the deck into the waste pile, tap the phone with 3 fingers.
Alternatively, tap the phone four times to draw more cards.
When you have run out of cards from the deck, you can replay the waste pile. To replay the waste pile, tap the phone twice with 3 fingers.

To undo a move, swipe left with 3 fingers. You can keep undo-ing moves until you get to the beginning of the game.
To go back to the main menu, swipe up with 3 fingers. To get quick help, press 3 fingers for two seconds.
In the main menu, the REPLAY GAME button deals the same set of cards, so you can try other strategies to win.
Each time you win a game, you can post your scores to Twitter or Facebook.

How to use coins

To play one round of Solitaire, you will use one coin.
If you purchased the STARTER PACK or any of the other packs, you don’t need coins.
This game comes with 10 coins, so you can play 10 rounds of any game.
More information is in the Common Features guide.

Settings

The SETTINGS screen has several sections.

In the first section of SETTINGS, you can change how the game performs.
You can turn off the background music.
You can turn off the phrase “The top waste card pile is” when drawing new cards.
You can turn off the zip-pop-bop sound that you hear when one of the cards in either the waste pile, or the tab-low, can be moved to the foundation.
You can turn on the gesture to automatically move the correct card to the foundation. This makes finishing the game much easier.
You can open all the cards in the tab-low, so that there are no face-down cards. This makes the game much easier since you are cheating a little.
You can have the app replay a message if it was not played the first time.
On some iphones, the iphone tells our app that a message was not spoken, even though the message was spoken.
If you encounter this problem, change this setting from ON to OFF.
You can use the voice-over voice instead of speech synthesis, for use with braille readers.
Sounds that are important in the game are repeated as words.

Refer to the Common Features guide for the second section.

Sections three and higher are for the games included in Blindfold Solitaire.
For each game, such as Klondike-1 or Klondike-3, there is a section for that game’s options.
For example, in Klondike-1, you can change how many passes through the deck are allowed, whether only kings can start an empty tab-low pile, and you can view a guide to winning a Klondike game.

In the third section of SETTINGS, you can get help of each variantion of Solitaire.
The sections after the third section lets you change settings for each family of games.
Section 4 is for the Klondike family.
Section 5 is for the Spider family.

Games

Klondike Hints

The Klondike game of Solitaire, also known as Patience, is one of the oldest known and most popular strategy card games of all time. Almost everyone knows how to play this game! It is the original card game played by millions of people unable to find other activities to attend to. However, after all these years it maintains its status as one of the most difficult and frustrating games to beat.

This guide uses the terms “face-up card”, “face-down card”, “deuce”, and “smooth”. “A face-up card is a card that you can see, or hear. A face-down card is one that you cannot see, or hear; in this app, you will hear a beep for a face-down card. A deuce is a 2 card, such as a 2 of hearts. Smooth means that two cards are in the same suit in the tab-low. For example a 7 of hearts followed by a 6 of spades followed by a 5 of hearts. The 7 and 5 are smooth, since they are both in the hearts suit.

Nine Items for Klondike Solitaire Strategy

1. Always play an Ace or deuce immediately, wherever you can.

2. Always make the play, or move that frees, or allows the next play to free,a face-down card, regardless of any other considerations.

3. When faced with a choice, always make the play or move that frees, or allows the next play that frees, a face-down card from the biggest pile of face-down cards.

4. Transfer cards from stack to stack only to allow a face-down card to be freed or to make the stack smoother.

5. Don’t clear a spot unless there’s a King IMMEDIATELY waiting to occupy it.

6. Only play a King that will benefit the stack or stacks with the biggest pile of face-down card, unless the play of another King will at least allow a move that frees a face-down card.

7. Only build your foundation stacks, with anything other than an Ace or deuce, when the play will do any of the following:
7.1: Not interfere with your Next Card Protection, or
7.2: allow a play or move that frees a face-down card, or allows the next play that frees a face-down card, or
7.3: open up a space for a same-color card pile move that allows a face-down card to be freed, or
7.4: clear a spot for an IMMEDIATE waiting King; it cannot be to simply clear a spot.

8. Don’t play or move a 5, 6, 7 or 8 anywhere unless at least one of the following situations will apply after the play:
8.1: It is smooth with it’s next highest even/odd partner in the stack.
8.2: It will allow a play or move that will IMMEDIATELY free a face-down card.
8.3: There have not been any other cards already played to the stack.
8.4: You have ABSOLUTELY no other choice to continue playing – this is not a good sign.

9. When you get to a point that you think all of your necessary cards are covered and you just can’t get to them, IMMEDIATELY play any cards you can to their appropriate foundation stacks. You may have to rearrange existing piles to allow blocked cards the freedom to be able to go to their foundation stack. Hopefully this will clear an existing pile up to the point that you can use an existing pile face-up card to substitute for the necessary covered card.

Most of the items, from one through nine in this strategy guide, should be simple to follow for the seasoned Solitaire player. For example, strategy item one states to Always play an Ace or deuce immediately wherever you can. Whenever and wherever you can, it is correct to immediately play an Ace to begin it’s foundation stack and to put a deuce onto an Ace or 3 card. This is something you already do without even thinking. If not, start doing that!

On item two (and also throughout this strategy guide) we use the phrase “frees a face-down card”. The tab-low initially has seven face-up cards, and seven increasingly bigger stacks of face-down cards for a total of 28 board cards (7 face-up, 21 face-down). When you free a face-down card, you are making a play or move that allows one of these face-down card to be turned face-up, thereby putting it into play. Freeing a face-down card is one of the most important tools in solving the game. If you cannot do so on a consistent basis, your chances for success will be greatly decreased. Free those face-down cards at any cost!

Item three also extends this logical concept with the addition that if given with a choice you should free the face-down card from the biggest pile of face-down cards possible. This should make sense to you immediately. If freeing face-down card is so important, wouldn’t it be your goal to dig into the pile that has the most of them if you can? It better be now! With these simple but highly effective strategy items, you now have an excellent grasp of the game and how to win. But let’s continue on to discover some of the finer points of this strategy guide that will help you win this increasingly not-so-difficult game.

Advanced Klondike Strategy Key #1: Use Next Card Protection

What is Next Card Protection? It’s simple – it means whenever you are building your foundation stacks (playing an Ace on the foundation and then proceeding to play additional cards onto the foundation), you may sometimes be able to play many more cards to one particular foundation stack instead of another.
For example, say you have the opportunity to play the 4 of spades to the foundation Spades stack.
Before you do, you consult this Solitaire strategy list and find item 7.1.
This advises against playing a card to a foundation stack unless it will preserve the Next Card Protection.
This means that unless there is a spot on the tab-low for the next lowest card below the potential foundation Ace card, you should not play the card to its foundation stack.
In this case there must be either another black four (the 4 of clubs) on the tab-low,
both red threes already played to their foundation stacks, or both red threes already played to the tab-low.
In all of these instances, you have protected the next card below the 4 of Spades, because if a red three comes up, you have ensured that it will be able to be played; in other words, you’ve left a “spot” open for them.
That’s the concept of Next Card Protection.

It is important to maintain Protection for a deuce; such as 2 of hearts. This means that you should delay the playing of a 3 card to a foundation stack in order to keep the availability of a spot for a deuce to be played to, unless both the applicable deuces had already been played, or were being protected due to the other 3 card being available on the tab-low. Protect your deuces, or you’ll be kicking yourself later!

Advanced Klondike Strategy Key #2: Playing Smooth and The 5-6-7-8 Block

Following the above items should keep you out of trouble concerning buried face-down cards, particularly strategy item number eight. When strictly followed, it somewhat limits the play of any 5, 6, 7 or 8 spot cards. In fact, this is the most crucial Solitaire Strategy item on the list. In some cases, you might be scratching your head wondering to yourself, “Why can’t I play my Seven of Hearts onto that Eight of Clubs?” One of the primary reasons is that a 5, 6, 7 or 8 may have to be smooth with it’s next highest same-color partner in the stack before it can be played. The smooth concept is also utilized in strategy item number four as well.

Playing “smooth” means that in the example above, you would only want to play or move, the Seven of Hearts onto the Eight of Clubs when the Eight was resting on the Nine of Hearts. In this case, the Seven would be smooth – meaning the same suit – with it’s next highest same-color partner in the stack, the Nine of Hearts. If instead, the Eight was resting on the Nine of Diamonds, the Seven of Hearts would not be the ideal play there; except under the other listed situations. This is because the Seven of Hearts is not smooth with the Diamond Nine; they are if different suits. Accordingly, a Six of Spades could be played onto either red Seven resting on the Eight of Spades. The Six would be smooth with it’s next highest same-color partner the Eight of Spades. You’re keeping the “Reds” same-suited with the other Reds above them in the stack, and the “Blacks” same-suited with all the other Blacks.

However, don’t forget to take into account the other considerations listed in strategy item eight! For example, you would go ahead and play a 5, 6, 7 or 8 onto a stack where it was not smooth with it’s next highest same-color partner, if the play would allow another play or move that would IMMEDIATELY free a face-down card. This is because – as also stated in item two – the freeing of face-down cards is of the utmost importance. Remember that!

As mentioned, you should also rearrange your stacks to make them smoother whenever possible, regardless of denomination. However, the reasons we have focused this strategy item specifically on the cards 5, 6, 7 and 8 are the result of much study. We discovered that when you start to play your cards from the tab-low to their foundation stacks – particularly late in the game – it is this stretch of cards in the stack that you will find the most difficulty moving cards up from, if they are not smooth with one another. The 5-6-7-8 block is the “meat” of the stack, and if handled improperly , it may cause the tab-low to become locked – you won’t be able to make a play to a foundation stack or move to free a card. That’s why item eight is so important to this strategy guide.

The reasons that item eight restrictions begin with 5’s and end with 8’s turn out to be fairly logical also. A four is allowed to be played anywhere at any time because it will hopefully catch a three, keeping the important deuce Protection available. The reason it ends with 8’s is that by the time you’ve reached the nines in the stack, you will have more than likely already have uncovered most, if not all, of the face-down cards on the tab-low, and at that point you will not have to worry about the remainder of the stack being smooth. You’ll just be tapping towards winning the game. Just keep the other cards smooth when you can and you’ll be fine.

Advanced Klondike Strategy Key #3: King Plays

For all of the other strategy items, the concepts provided here are straight-forward and simple, but let’s go over some of the King plays just to quickly clarify some points. When you “clear” a spot for a King, it means that you have played, or moved out, all the cards in the stack. There are no cards left there! And according to strategy item five, you shouldn’t clear a spot unless there’s a King IMMEDIATELY waiting to occupy it. This means that you don’t want to clear a spot just because you can. There must be a King waiting to occupy it, either via a move, or play, from the deck. You may also clear a spot when you have gone through the deck at least once, and know that the premature clearance won’t affect you.

Solitaire strategy item six goes even further in suggesting that you should only play a King that will benefit the stacks with the biggest pile of face-down cards, unless the play of another King will at least allow a move that frees a face-down card.
This means that if the face-up card on the seventh stack at the beginning of the game is a 9 of Diamonds, you would want to play the King of Diamonds, or the King of Hearts, to an open spot, instead of the King of Spades or King of Clubs. The reason is that the Red Kings will allow the greatest chance of the 9 of Diamonds to be moved off the biggest face-down card stack, since the next cards on one of them would be a Black Queen – Queen of Spades or Queen of Clubs, then a Red Jack and a Black Ten, which would gladly accept the Red 9 at that point. A quick way to remember which King would be correct is that Kings and Jacks are Odds, and Queens are Evens.

Enjoy the game, and thanks for playing Blindfold Solitaire.

Spider Games

Spider is played with one to four standard decks of playing cards using one or more suits, for a total of 104 cards.
Spider one suit is played with 8 decks and uses only the spades suit, and is the easiest game.
Spider two suits is played with 4 decks and uses the spades and hearts suits.
Spider four suits is played with 2 decks and uses all clubs, diamonds, hearts and spades, and is the most difficult game.

Objective

The object of the game is to build cards of descending suit sequence from King to Ace. e.g. King, Queen, Jack, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, Ace within the tab-low columns. When such a sequence has been formed, it is automatically removed from the tab-low. When all 104 cards have been played as eight separate King to Ace sequences, the game is won.

Spider Rules

All building is carried out on the tab-low columns.
You may move any exposed card from the end of a tableau column to another tableau column if it creates a descending sequence (regardless of suit);
for example, a 5 of spades on a 6 of spades or a 2 of hearts on a 3 of spades.
You may also move a packed descending sequence of cards as a group to another tab-low column but only if they’re of the same suit;
for example 9 of spades, 8 of spades and 7 of spades on a 10 of spades or a 10 of hearts.
Therefore, you should try to pack cards of the same suit if you have a choice, otherwise you’ll find the game blocks quickly.
If you manage to create a complete descending sequence of cards from King to Ace of the same suit, for example: King of hearts , Queen of hearts , Jack of hearts , 10 of hearts , 9 of hearts , 8 of hearts , 7 of hearts , 6 of hearts , 5 of hearts , 4 of hearts , 3 of hearts , 2 of hearts and Ace of hearts, then it will be removed from the tab-low automatically.
Empty tab-low columns may be filled by any card or a packed descending suit sequence of cards.

When there are no more moves, you can deal more cards onto the tab-low and try to work the the new cards to build sequences that will help
you complete sequences on the entire tab-low. To deal more cards, tap with 3 fingers. One card will be dealt to each of the tab-low columns.

To hear the number of deals left in the deck, and the number of king to ace sequences that have been cleared, tap the screen once with two fingers.

Enjoy the game, and thanks for playing Blindfold Solitaire Spider.

Addition Games

Addition games are played with one or more decks of playing cards.

Objective

The object of the addition games is to select two cards that add up to a certain value. In some games, a single card may also match that value.

Baroness Rules

Baroness is played with a single 52 card deck that is dealt to the tab-low in 5 piles.
The remaining cards are placed deck that you can draw from if you get stuck.
You try to remove cards that add up to 13, where Jack is worth 11, Queen is worth 12 and King is worth 13. An ace is worth 1.
For example, you can remove a 2 and a Jack, or a 6 and a 7, or a Queen and an Ace.
To remove a pair of cards, select the first card by tapping twice with two fingers, then move to the second card, and tap twice again with two fingers.
You can remove the King by itself by tapping twice with two fingers, since it is already worth 13.

If you get stuck, tap the screen with 3 fingers, and one new card is dealt to each of the 5 piles.
You can move the top card on any pile to an empty pile.
To cancel the first card of a pair, shake the phone or swipe down with 3 fingers.

You win the game when all the cards have been removed from the tab-low. You lose the game if you’ve exhausted the deck and there are still cards on the tab-low.

Fourteen Out Rules

Fourteen Out is played with a single 52 card deck that is dealt to the tab-low in 4 piles of 5 cards and 8 columns of 4 cards, using up the entire deck. Since no cards are left in the deck, you cannot draw from the deck.
You try to remove cards that add up to 14, where Jack is worth 11, Queen is worth 12 and King is worth 13. An ace is worth 1.
For example, you can remove a 2 and a Queen, or a 6 and a 8, or a Jack and a three.
To remove a pair of cards, select the first card by tapping twice with two fingers, then move to the second card, and tap twice again with two fingers.
You cannot remove single cards since their value is never more than 13.

You win the game when all the cards have been removed from the tab-low. You lose the game if there are still cards on the tab-low.
The chance of winning this game is 33%.

Try to reduce the tab-low piles evenly; if you empty a tab-low pile it will be useless from then on and you want to have as many cards available for choice as possible.
Watch out for potential blockages: if there are a Queen and a 2 in the same pile, you’ll need another Queen-2 pair to break them up. Similarly, watch out for crossed pairs such as a Queen above a 4 in one pile, and a 9 above a 2 in another.

Gay Gordons Rules

Gay Gordons is played with a single 52 card deck that is dealt to the tab-low in 2 piles of 6 cards and 8 columns of 5 cards, using up the entire deck. Since no cards are left in the deck, you cannot draw from the deck.
You try to remove cards that add up to 11.
For example, you can remove a 3 and an 8, or a 5 and a 6.
Some cards are special and can only be removed by a corresponding card.
To remove a king, pair it with a queen.
To remove a jack, pair it with another jack.
To remove a ten, pair it with an ace.
To remove a pair of cards, select the first card by tapping twice with two fingers, then move to the second card, and tap twice again with two fingers.

You win the game when all the cards have been removed from the tab-low. You lose the game if there are still cards on the tab-low.

Enjoy the game, and thanks for playing Blindfold Solitaire Addition Games.

Freecell Games

FreeCell is played with one decks of playing cards and is slightly similar to Klondike.

The different piles

There are three different types of piles in FreeCell.
There are four free cells. Each free cell can hold one card. To get to the free cells, tap in the upper right half of the screen.
There are four foundation piles. To get to the foundation, tap in the upper left half of the screen.
The are eight piles tab-low piles. To get there, tap in the bottom half of the screen.
There is no deck or waste pile.
The deck is fully dealt to the tab-low when the game begins.

The setup

The tab-low piles are numbered from 1 to 8, piles 1 to 4 start with 7 cards each and piles 5 to 8 start
with 6 cards each. The Foundations and Free Cells are empty.

The objective

To win FreeCell, you must get all the cards onto the Foundations. The Foundations are ordered by suit
and rank, each Foundation has one suit and you must put the cards onto them in the order Ace, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, Jack, Queen, King.
To do that you can use the moves described below.

Allowed moves

You can move the top card of
a pile on the tab-low onto another tab-low pile, if that pile’s top card is one higher than the moved card and in a
different color. For example, you could move a red 6 onto a black 7.

If you have an empty tab-low pile then you can move any card there.

You can always move the top card of any tab-low Pile, Free Cell or
Foundation onto a Free Cell if it’s empty. Free Cell’s can only hold a single card at a time.

You can move a card from a Free Cell onto a Foundation if it’s in the same
suit and one higher than the Foundation’s top card. Or you can move a card from a Free Cell onto a tab-low pile if the
card is one lower and in a different color than the tab-low pile’s top card. E.g. you could move a red 5 from a Free Cell
onto a tab-low pile where the current top card was a black 6.

You can move a tab-low card onto the Foundations.
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You can Undo as many times as you like. The game offers unlimited undos. Each Undo counts as a new move though,
so if you’re trying to win the game in as few moves as possible you should be careful about how many undos you use.
–>

About the game

Freecell solitiare is more interesting than klondike solitaire in that you can beat EVERY SINGLE GAME.
Unlike nearly all other forms of solitaire, you can use your sheer brainpower instead of luck to beat the card game.
Historically, freecell solitaire has been accredited as being a very mathematically enlightening game.

Baker’s Game

Baker’s Game is a variant of Free Cell, but instead of descending cards of alternating colors on the tab-low, you can only build piles in the same suit on the tab-low.
For example, only a 9 of spades can be placed on a 10 of spades.
The rules for the foundation piles and the free cells are the same as in Free Cell.

Seahaven Towers

Seahaven Towers is a variant of Baker’s Game, but there are 10 foundation piles instead of 8 in Baker’s Game, and only KING can be placed on an empty tab-low pile.
Just like in Baker’s Game, you can only build piles in the same suit on the tab-low.
There are 6 cards on the first two tab-low piles and 5 cards on the remaining eight piles.
All other rules are the same as Baker’s Game.

Free Cell Two Pack

Just like Free Cell, but with 2 decks and 8 free cells. Complete the upper foundations by suit, ace to king, once, and then do it all over again on top of that complete foundation.
When a king is added to a foundation pile, that foundation pile is cleared.
The tab-low has 10 piles, with 11 cards in the first 4 piles and 10 cards in the other 6 piles.

Eight Off

Just like Free Cell, but with 8 free cells. It’s easier than Free Cell.

Three Cells

Just like Free Cell, but with 3 free cells. It’s harder than Free Cell, and about 99% of the games can still be won.

Two Cells

Just like Free Cell, but with 2 free cells. It’s harder than Three Cells,only 78% of the games can theoretically be won.

One Cell

Just like Free Cell, but with only one free cell. It’s very hard; only 19% of the games can theoretically be won.

Easy Shuffle

Just like Free Cell, but the cards are shuffled in such a way that low ranking card are dealt towards the exposed end of the tableau columns rather than being buried deep. This makes the game easier.

Hard Shuffle

Just like Free Cell, but the cards are shuffled in such a way that low ranking card are dealt early on, burying them deeper within the tab-low piles.
This makes the game more difficult.

Enjoy the game, and thanks for playing Blindfold Solitaire FreeCell.

Golf Games

Golf is played with one deck of playing cards.

Objective

The object of the game is to move all the cards from the tab-low to the waste pile. When all the tab-low cards have been moved, the game is won.

Golf Rules

Golf is played with a single 52 card deck that is dealt to the tab-low in 7 piles of 5 cards.
The remaining 17 cards are placed deck that you can draw from if you get stuck.
You try to remove all the cards from the tab-low piles, and you can only remove the top card.
Only the topmost card in each pile may be removed from the tab-low. When it is removed, the card beneath becomes available for play.
To move a card to the waste pile, tap the screen twice.

You can remove a card and place it on the top of the waste pile, if the card has a value that is one greater than or one less than the card that is on top of the waste pile.
For example, if the waste pile has a 6 of hearts, you can take a 5 of any suit, or a 7 of any suit from the topmost cards in the tab-low.
If you get stuck, you can draw the next card from the deck, which changes the cards you can draw from the topmost cards.

In Golf, the ace is low: if you have an ace on the waste pile, you can only select a 2 from the topmost cards.
In Putt-Putt, the ace can be either high or low; if you have an ace on the waste pile, you can select either a 2 or a king from the topmost cards.

More Variations

Double Golf is just like Golf, but with 2 decks, and the layout is 10 piles with 7 cards per pile.
Double Putt is just like Putt Putt, but with 2 decks, and the layout is 10 piles with 7 cards per v.
Partner Creek is just like Putt Putt, but with 4 decks, and the layout is 12 piles with 12 cards per pile.
Black Hole is just like Putt Putt, but with 1 deck, and the layout is 17 piles with 3 cards per pile.
In Black Hole, there is only one card in the deck. All other moves are from the 17 piles.

Enjoy the game, and thanks for playing Blindfold Solitaire Golf.

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